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Firefighter Suspended After Facebook Post About Narcan Goes Viral

| by Jonathan Constante
The Facebook post The Facebook post

A Massachusetts firefighter has been suspended after posting a controversial Facebook status about Narcan.

Narcan prevents or reverses the effects of opioids including respiratory depression, sedation and hypotension, according to Drugs.com.  It is used primarily to treat overdoses of drugs such as heroin, oxycodone and hydrocodone, as noted by StopOverdose.org.

In the post, Weymouth firefighter Mark Carron called Narcan the “worst drug ever created,” Fox 25 reported. He went on to call users of Narcan “losers” who we should let die.

“I for one get no extra money for giving narcan and these losers are out of the hospital and using again in hours, you use, you should loose!” Carron wrote.

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The post has since been deleted, but not before a screenshot was shared by hundreds of social media users.

The Weymouth Fire Department announced on Feb. 1 that they have suspended Carron for 90 days. Carron will also undergo mandatory counseling, along with sensitivity and social media training.

“I take a lot of pride in our department and so do a lot of members of our department and I just think it was a bad judgment call on this individual,” Weymouth Fire Chief Keith Stark told Fox 25.

Weymouth Mayor Robert Hedulund echoed Stark’s statement.

“We're very disappointed with the tone - it doesn't speak for the commitment or values of the Weymouth Fire Department,” Hedulund said. “And many of you are aware Weymouth has been severely impacted by the whole opiate epidemic that we see throughout the state and the country.”

Families who have been afflicted by drug addiction gathered for a small rally on Feb. 1. While some were calling for the termination of Carron, others were more forgiving.

“It's an addiction, people just don't understand,” said William Hill. Hill’s 24-year-old son died of an overdose last spring and had been saved by Narcan twice before.

“Let's give this guy a second chance as well just like Narcan gives these kids a second chance,” another attendee said.

Sources: Fox 25, StopOverdose IL, StopOverdose.org, Drugs.com / Photo Credit: Fox 25

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