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Monster Truck Rescues Flood Victims In Texas (Video)

| by Michael Allen
Deborah Wright getting into a monster truckDeborah Wright getting into a monster truck

Cole Geeo, the owner of a monster truck, rescued flood victims in Millsap, Texas, April 18 (video below).

Geeo and his eight-foot tall monster truck rescued Deborah Wright, who was stuck on her second floor balcony because a nearby river had risen.

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"It just came up so quickly," Wright told WFAA via phone. "This is not my first rodeo with this."

"That's a redneck rescue I do believe," Wright's co-worker Dina Young-Gray stated.

Gray called for help when Wright was stranded by floodwaters.

"That’s just how Millsap is," Gray stated. "We just look out for one another."

"It’s just been an adventurous day," Wright said.

However, the Parker County Emergency Management advised people not to rely on their friends for rescue, but rather professionals via 911.

NBC Dallas-Fort Worth reports that five people died from the flood waters within the Houston area.

Harris County, which covers much of Houston, was coming close to 20 inches of rainfall on the evening of April 17.

Republican Gov. Greg Abbott of Texas declared nine southeast Texas counties to be disaster areas April 18.

Harris County Judge Ed Emmett said two bodies were discovered in a vehicle that tried to drive around barricades and get through a flooded underpass.

Emmett added that thousands homes outside of Houston were flooded, prompting at least 450 high-water rescues.

Another person was discovered in a vehicle that was under water near George Bush Intercontinental Airport, and a truck driver was found dead his 18-wheeler after running into high flood waters on a freeway service road.

Harris County Precinct Sgt. Herbert Martinez said the truck driver could have had a medical emergency.

The Houston Independent School District canceled classes April 18 because of the flooding.

While the Houston area is somewhat flat, the city does sit at almost sea level and has "gumbo" soft soil, notes NBC Dallas-Fort Worth, making it vulnerable to big rainfalls and storms.

Sources: WFAANBC Dallas-Fort Worth / Photo credit: WFAA via YouTube