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German Shepherd Sings Duet With Owner (Video)

| by Robert Fowler

Some dogs cannot repress their desire to knock their head back and let out a tuneful howl.

When one German shepherd's playful owner decided to belt out a notoriously corny song, the loyal pooch couldn't help but chime in with his own singing (video below).

Maximus is an affectionate German shepherd that routinely responds to human singing by forming an interspecies duet. After the lovable dog's owner observed that he would howl without fail whenever music was in the air, he decided to have a little fun and record his pet in the act, Shareably reports.

One day, Maximus' owner placed a camera in his bathroom before taking a shower. With the German shepherd resting on the bathroom floor, his owner began to cheekily sing the much-parodied internet hit, "Trololo."

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The silly tune, sung by Russian crooner Eduard Khil in 1976, had languished in anonymity for decades until it became a viral sensation in 2010, serving as a soundtrack for humorous YouTube videos, according to the New York Daily News.

"Trololo" proved to be an appropriate choice for what was destined to be another viral hit. Maximus, hearing his owner's baritone pipes emanate from the shower, immediately responds with a tortured moan. Soon enough, the German shepherd raises his head and lets rip a soaring howl.

Maximus and his owner begin to harmonize, the dog's soulful moans matching the human's trolling reverberations in the shower.

Dogs that melodically bark inherited their penchant for singing from ancestral wolves. Animal behaviorist Peter Borchelt explains that canines howl to identify fellow pack members and for social pleasure.

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"It's like a family singing," Borchelt said, according to MSNBC.

Clinical behavior Terry Marie Curtis of the University of Florida's College of Veterinary Medicine notes that certain dog breeds are more likely to howl than others, and that dogs respond to certain sonic cues for different reasons. She cited one instance in which a client adopted a Siberian husky as an example of a dog showing an ambiguous reaction to music.

"[The client] took the puppy from his mom, put it in the car, and there was some sort of Celtic music playing ... and the puppy was howling," Curtis told Slate. "In that case, was the dog feeling melancholy? Was the dog feeling sad? These are human terms. [Was the music] associated with being taken away from his mom? Did he like the sound of the music? It’s really tough.”

While the emotions' behind certain canine howling can be cryptic, Maximus appears to be more tickled than sad as he and his owner croon out "Trololo."

Sources: MSNBCShareably, Slate, New York Daily News / Photo Credit: AllAboutDogs.net/Flickr

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