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'Phillip The Duck' Gets New 3D-Printed Feet (Video)

| by Michael Allen
Phillip the Duck with new 3D-printed feetPhillip the Duck with new 3D-printed feet

Phillip the duck had lost his feet to frostbite before he was rescued by Vicki Rabe-Harrison in Oshkosh, Wisconsin (video below).

"There was a girl that had to move out of her home that had goats and chickens and ducks and all sort of critters," Rabe-Harrison told WBAY, "and there was a picture of Phillip with his feet all curled up and dried because they had frozen."

"So I immediately said I would come and get him," she told ABC News.

After Rabe-Harrison rescued Phillip, she could not find any help for him and considered having him euthanized.

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"I made a call to have him put down, because he was not going to live well at my home," Rabe-Harrison explained.

Fortunately, she learned that a local teacher, Jason Jischke, had a 3D printer in his classroom.

Jischke ended up rescuing the duck from the duck rescuer. After receiving an email from Rabe-Harrison about Phillip's situation, he jumped into action.

"I immediately called Vicki right from class actually, pulled out my cell phone, and called, and I said, 'Vicki, I’m making feet right now, hold off,'" Jischke told WBAY.

Jischke made the 3D-printed feet out of a material called "Ninja-Flex." Phillip took his first steps with his new feet on April 15.

"It's so exciting to see him with his feet, so he has a new life," Rabe-Harrison told ABC News.

Philip waddled to a new home: an animal sanctuary operated by Brandon and Alyssa Herbst.

"Our vet has already called us and said, 'I can’t wait to see him, I just can’t wait,'" Brandon told WBAY.

"It’s really important to us that we can give excellent care to every single one of the animals in our sanctuary," Alyssa said.

There are also goats and horses at the sanctuary.

"We have about 15 to 20 active volunteers right now," Alyssa added. "And then we have probably about 30 or so who are able to come sometimes."

Phillip's amazing new feet are a temporary fix while a college engineering department (hopefully) creates a permanent solution for his lack of flippers.

Sources: WBAY, ABC News / Photo Credit: ABC News via YouTube

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