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Deer Bonds With Man Who Nursed Her Back To Health (Video)

| by Reve Fisher
Injured Deer.Injured Deer.

An animal lover who rescued an injured fawn and nursed it back to health before releasing her back to her mother in the wild captured the whole process on camera (video below). Although the man doesn't condone taking animals from the wild and raising them as pets, "this was a special situation," he notes in the YouTube video caption.

Outdoorsman Darius was watching a family of deer near Yellowstone National Park when he noticed one of the fawns had an injured front leg, reports the Daily Mail. "The fawn was helpless," Darius told The Dodo. "She was just born earlier that day."

The fawn kept getting left behind, so the man decided to take care of the fawn at his house. Because the young animal was injured, she would have most likely been killed by predators, notes The Dodo.

At his house, the fawn settled in. He nursed the young animal back to health with a regular feeding schedule and a leg splint made out of a cardboard oatmeal box. "I had to do some Internet search[es] and reading to be able to understand how to [raise] a fawn … get up at night to feed her every four hours, and clean her after," Darius said.

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The outdoorsman said his dog Mack helped with the fawn: "He just loved her and cleaned her so good."

Two weeks after he took her in, the fawn had made a full recovery and it was time to release her back into the wild. "She's already used to me, and she follows me, but nobody can replace her real mom," the man said in the video.

Darius brought the fawn outside to release her to a deer family, but she always came back. One night, the deer spotted her mother and joined her family again.

"[I've] seen [the family] many times after release, also seen them recently in the fall," the outdoorsman said. "The mother deer usually does not go too far from the place where she feels safe, so she stays around the area."

"It is [a] very, very good feeling seeing them safe roaming around," Darius commented.

Sources: The Dodo, Daily Mail / Photo credit: The Dodo