Religion

Report: Popular Christian Video Blogger Had Ashley Madison Account

| by Michael Allen

Sam Rader, a popular Christian blogger (along with his wife Nia), was allegedly a member of the adultery web site Ashley Madison, according to a new report.

The couple, who have two small children, made news earlier this month when Sam secretly tested his wife's urine from a toilet and told her that she was pregnant. Nia claimed three days later to have miscarried, but some medical experts questioned the pregnancy, noted Buzzfeed News. In response,  Sam followed up with diatribe against the "haters," and said his family was being persecuted for being Christians (videos below).

The Daily Mail reports today that Sam was listed as a former paid member per the Ashley Madison data that was recently dumped online by hackers.

Sam allegedly paid Ashley Madison $189 twice in September 2013, which would have been when his second child was born during his fourth year of marriage to Nia. There were allegedly four more payments by Sam to Ashley Madison for $14 each.

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According to the Daily Mail, the account info was first revealed in an online 4chan forum, which are notorious for exposing hacked content.

The data reportedly included Sam's name, his home address and zip code in Terrell, Texas, and his email with the destination @BecauseThatsWhy.com, notes the Daily Mail.

The Daily Mail reports that the BecauseThatsWhy.com domain was registered to Sam.

"We are not going to comment on this right now," Sam's manager told the Daily Mail. Sam and Nia are reportedly appearing at a video blogging conference in Seattle.

Sam told BuzzFeed News earlier this month that he had quit his job as an ER nurse to focus on video blogging and his photography business.

TubeMogul told BuzzFeed News that Sam and Nia probably make $9.60 for every one thousand non-skippable ad views on their YouTube videos, which could mean they are raking in as much as six figures.

Sources: Daily Mail, Buzzfeed News / Photo Image: YouTube Screenshot