Religion

Poll: Many Americans Have Double Standard For Christian, Muslim Terrorists

| by Michael Allen
Anti-Muslim Protest.Anti-Muslim Protest.

A poll released on Dec. 10 shows that many Americans have a double standard when it comes to terrorist acts committed by Christians and Muslims.

According to the Public Religion Research Institute's survey, 75 percent of Americans believe that self-identified Christians who commit terrorism are not real Christians, while 19 percent say these terrorists are indeed Christians.

But when it comes to self-identified Muslims who perpetrate terrorist acts, 50 percent of Americans believe these Muslims are not true Muslims, while 37 percent believe they are real Muslims.

New America's online International Security Program has kept count of terrorist attacks since 9/11, and has found 45 people have died from "deadly jihadist attacks," while 48 have been killed by "deadly right wing attacks."

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Charles Kurzman, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and David Schnauzer, director of the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security at Duke University, wrote an editorial in The New York Times in June that said in part: 

"Since 9/11, an average of nine American Muslims per year have been involved in an average of six terrorism-related plots against targets in the United States. Most were disrupted, but the 20 plots that were carried out accounted for 50 fatalities over the past 13 and a half years.

"In contrast, right-wing extremists averaged 337 attacks per year in the decade after 9/11, causing a total of 254 fatalities, according to a study by Arie Perliger, a professor at the United States Military Academy’s Combating Terrorism Center. The toll has increased since the study was released in 2012."

Sources: Public Religion Research InstituteInternational Security Program, The New York Times / Photo credit: David Shankbone/Flickr