Religion

Muslim Truck Drivers Win Lawsuit After Being Fired For Refusing To Deliver Beer

| by Lauren Briggs
red and white semi truckred and white semi truck

Two former Illinois truck drivers received $240,000 in damages and back pay after they were fired in 2009 for refusing to deliver beer.

The jury ruled in favor of Mahad Abass Mohamed and Abdkiarim Hassan Bulshale on Oct. 20 in a decision that has angered many, the Christian Science Monitor reports.

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"It’s unfortunate when the government interferes in a private dispute over religious views and takes sides, and chooses one religion over another," Fox News' legal analyst Judge Andrew Napolitano told Megyn Kelly on Oct. 26, according to the Christian Science Monitor.

However, under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, employers are required to accommodate workers' religious beliefs as long as doing so would not impose "undue hardship" on the business.

UCLA law professor Eugene Volokh told the Washington Post that it would have been reasonable to accommodate the two Somali-American men's request, considering that the trucking company admitted that drivers would often switch their assignments.

Fox News host Megyn Kelly disagreed.

“The Obama administration actually represented the two Muslims in this case, but has sometimes taken a very different position in the case of Christians trying to assert their religious beliefs," Kelly said, according to the Independent Journal. 

She read a statement from the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), who represented Mohamed and Bulshale.

"We are proud to support the rights of workers to equal treatment in the workplace without having to sacrifice their religious beliefs or practices; it’s fundamental to the American principles of religious freedom and tolerance," the EEOC said, according to Kelly.

"But when it comes to the Christian bakers, it’s not as fundamental," Kelly added, referencing the Oregon bakers who refused to serve gay couples. The couple was then fined $135,000 in damages by the state for discrimination.

Kelly also cited the case of Kim Davis, the Kentucky county clerk who was jailed for refusing to issue marriage licensee.

Sources: Christian Science Monitor, Independent Journal
Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons, Ed Kohler/Flickr