Mormon Dad Is Disappointed His Son Doesn't Oppose Gay Scout Leaders

| by Michael Allen

The Boy Scouts of America recently voted to allow openly-gay scout leaders in its organization.

However, churches that sponsor Boy Scout troops will still be allowed to make their own rules and ban gay leaders, reported The Washington Post.

Quin Monson, a professor at Brigham Young University and father of a Boy Scout, recently told NPR how disappointed he was in the new rule:

So, the church took the Boy Scout program and decided that its values and mission aligned closely enough with that of the church's program for young men that they just wholesale adopted it and have had local congregations sponsor or charter scout groups. And basically, if you are a young Mormon male, you join the Boy Scouts.

Monson admitted that Mormon teachings overlapped in scout troops that are sponsored by the church.

Monson added:

The BSA statement allows for leaders who are openly gay, and what that means in practice is, I don't think, exactly clear, but I think it very well could conflict with the church's own policy, which is you can identify as gay and be an active, faithful member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. The problem is acting on that same-sex attraction, so there's a distinction made between actions and orientation.

Monson recalled that his son's reaction was: "Well, I don't see why it matters, Dad. Why is this such a big deal?"

Monson lamented that his son wasn't in opposition to gay scout leaders: "That's the hard part about all of this, is that it impacts a group of young men who don't necessarily understand why."

The Mormon church banned black priests until 1978, years after the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. Mormon church leaders claimed at the time that they had experienced a revelation to stop discriminating against blacks.

The Associated Press reported in 2013 that church leaders explained their reasoning on the church's website:

The Church disavows the theories advanced in the past that black skin is a sign of divine disfavor or curse, or that it reflects actions in a premortal life; that mixed-race marriages are a sin; or that blacks or people of any other race or ethnicity are inferior in any way to anyone else.

Sources: NPR, Associated Press via The Huffington Post, The Washington Post / Photo Credit: