Religion

Maryland School For The Blind Suspends Bible Study Classes

| by Karen Eisenberg

Just when Hobby Lobby begins pushing public schools to teach Bible study, the Maryland School for the Blind suspends its Bible study class after 10 years. According to Fox News, the Maryland school told a local church leader it was canceling the class because of "church-state" issues.

Todd Starnes with Fox News is demanding the school reinstate the program. He says "The Maryland School for the Blind needs to do the right thing and reinstate the Bible Study club immediately."

The debate to separate church from state is becoming increasingly popular here in the United States. Just recently, Kyle Loveless (R-Oklahoma City), proposed Senate Bill 48, which would allow public schools to teach an ‘elective’ course focusing on religion and the Bible. Craft store Hobby Lobby, well known for its support of Christian religion, is backing the bill.

But it is not only schools that are being affected by the issue of church and state. Towns and cities are also being forced to make tough decisions. Coal Run, Kentucky is facing backlash from an activist organization for displaying nativity scenes in public during Christmastime.  Coal Run Mayor Andrew H. Scott says he will not back down and accuses the left of “trying to fundamentally change things in America.”

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Similar to what happened last year in Coal Run, the Freedom from Religion Foundation (FFRF) wants the town of Brookeville, Indiana to remove a Christmas nativity scene which is displayed near the Franklin County Courthouse and has been a town tradition for more than 50 years. The FFRF claims that Brookville is using the government to endorse a religious message and claims this is a violation of the Constitution.

Basically, the activists don’t want the government, or schools, to promote biblical messages and the townspeople argue that they should not have to cater to others or change the way they have been doing things for years, just because they have different beliefs.

I predict this debate will continue on for many more years.

Sources: Fox News; The Blaze; Fox19; Huffington Post

Photo: Wikimedia