Religion

Kentucky Taxpayers To Pay For In God We Trust Signs

| by Jordan Smith
KentuckyCapitalKentuckyCapital

Taxpayers in Kentucky are to foot the bill for “In God We Trust” signs which have been placed in committee rooms at the state’s legislative building.

Following legislation sponsored by Republican Albert Robinson in 2014, the 13 signs were installed at a cost of $2,811, the Lexington Herald Leader reported.

“In the long run, taxpayers will not get stuck for their cost, even though the state will pay the bill now,” Robinson told the Herald Leader, insisting he would raise the funds next year.

“That's exactly what's going to happen,” Robinson added. “I intend to raise the money when the next legislative session starts in January or will pay for it myself. I have deep convictions on this.”

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Robinson’s original legislation did not specify who would pay for the signs.

The signs include the national motto printed in gold letters on a blue background, as well as the Kentucky state seal.

The signs are not universally welcome.

“Government should not favor one religion over another but we have seen challenges to similar situations not go far since it is the national motto,” said Michael Aldridge of the Kentucky branch of the American Civil Liberties Union.

“We just believe that government is supposed to represent everyone — the religious and non-religious,” said Rob Boston of Americans United for Separation of Church and State when the signs were installed last December, Lexington Herald Leader (2) reported.

“In God We Trust” signs have been displayed in the state’s Senate and House chambers since 2006.

The controversy in Kentucky is the latest in a number of disputes involving “In God We Trust” signs across the country.

Earlier this week, STLtoday reported that “In God We Trust” stickers placed on police cars in Texas had drawn numerous complaints. Many of these were filed by the Freedom From Religion Foundation, another organization campaigning for the separation of church and state.

Sources: Lexington Herald Leader, Lexington Herald Leader (2), STLtoday/ photo credit: WHAS 11