Religion

In God We Trust Signs Mounted On Alamance County Buildings

| by Jordan Smith

Another county in North Carolina has completed the installation of ‘In God We Trust’ signs on its government buildings.

Three signs were installed Thursday on the Alamance County Criminal Court Building, the Administration Building, and inside the commissioners’ meeting room.

The initiative was proposed by the US Motto Action Committee, which has so far persuaded 33 counties and over 20 cities across the state to install the signs, My Fox 8 reported.

Each installation has been paid for by private funds, and in Alamance these were raised by the Lowe Memorial Baptist Church.

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“Because we believe it,” Bill Gindlesperger, pastor at the church, said, according to the Burlington Times News. “In God we trust. We believe that, and the way the nation is going now we believe that even more. We are told to trust in the Lord and to have no confidence in man.”

The committee’s goal is to have similar signs on every county building in the state, but they acknowledge that this task will be tougher in bigger cities, My Fox 8 reported.

“This nation is certainly based on Judeo-Christian values and there was never any question early on about whether this nation endorsed God,” said Ron Baity, another member of the committee.

However, not everyone is happy about the recent growth in the number of ‘In God We Trust’ signs around the state.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) launched a legal challenge against the first county to put up an ‘In God We Trust’ sign in 2002.

That challenge, against Davidson County, was ultimately rejected by a US Appeals Court ruling in 2005.

“Government buildings should welcome all members of the community equally, not just those who share the majority religious view. People who practice a different religion, or no religion at all, should not be made to feel like outsiders when they enter their local courthouse or government office,” an ACLU official said to My Fox 8, in response to the developments in Alamance County.

Sources: My Fox 8, Burlington Times News/ photo credit: Burlington Times News