Religion

Georgia Baptist Slams Religious Freedom For Muslims

| by Michael Allen
Gerald HarrisGerald Harris

Gerald Harris, editor of the official newspaper of the Georgia Baptist Mission Board, slammed Muslims on June 6 by arguing that their freedom of religion should not be legally protected like other religions in America.

Harris was upset the Southern Baptist Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, the SBC International Mission Board and other religious groups joined a Christian-based law firm in support of some Muslims trying to build a mosque for nearly ten years in New Jersey.

Harris wrote in his paper, The Christian Index: "While Muslims around the world and in our own country are shouting 'Death to America' should we be defending their rights to build mosques, which often promote Sharia Law and become training grounds for radicalizing Muslims?"

He went on to quote others who have made disparaging and bigoted remarks about Muslims and Islam, including Republican Rep. Jody Hice of Georgia.

Harris added: "So, do Southern Baptists entities need to come to the defense of a geo-political movement that has basically set itself against Western Civilization? Even if Islam is a religion must we commit ourselves to fight for the religious freedom of a movement that aggressively militates against other religions?"

Harris continued: "Furthermore, it must be understood that to Muslims, freedom of religion means practicing Islam only. Muslims are compelled by the Quran to destroy all other religions by whatever means necessary so that Islam may be the only religion in the entire world."

Harris later spelled out what sounded like Muslim plot against America:

Freedom of religion in America is designed to protect the rights and dignity of different religious communities, so they can practice their respective rites and ordinances without fear and interference.

However, religious freedom for Muslims means allowing them the right to establish Islam as the state religion, subjugating infidels, even murdering those who are critics of Islam and those who oppose their brutal religion.

In essence they want to use our democracy to establish their theocracy (with Allah as supreme). Their goal politically is to destroy the Constitution with its imbedded freedom and democracy and replace it with Sharia Law.

After warning about Islam's plot to create a theocracy, Harris explained why Islam was not worthy of equal protection under U.S. law.

"When we engage in a crusade to grant political Islam all the rights and privileges of other religions, we are not engaged on a level playing field," he wrote. "We are not comparing apples to apples. The more leniency we give in the present to Muslims who may desire Sharia Law, the less freedom we will be giving in the future to ourselves.

In response to his scathing editorial, the Georgia chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations invited Harris to an interfaith dinner on June 18 at a mosque in Atlanta.

Harris told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on June 8:

I’m going to try to go to that meeting (June 18) or one of the other meetings offered to me

Sometime soon, I’m going to go. I thought they were very gracious to extend that invitation to me. I would be interested in finding out more about the Council on American-Islamic Relations. I’ve read about it.

It professes to be for religious liberty. I would like to know if they would be willing to have a Christian church built in Mecca. That would be a demonstration of religious liberty, I think.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations has no control over Mecca, which is in Hejaz, Saudi Arabia.

CAIR-Georgia Executive Director Edward Ahmed Mitchell told the newspaper in response: “Americans who meet and greet their Muslim neighbors tend to hold far more tolerant and positive opinions about Islam. We look forward to a friendly discussion with Dr. Harris about the values that unite us as Americans, people of faith and human beings.”

Sources: Christian IndexThe Atlanta Journal-Constitution / Photo Credit: Gerald Harris/Twitter

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