Religion

County Clerk In Trouble Over Crosses

| by Maura Turcotte

If you are a county clerk, you may have to choose your office decorations wisely.

For her office in a courthouse, Connie Wade, a county clerk for Gregg County in East Texas, chose to display over 20 crosses on her walls, visible to the public. However, she recently found herself in trouble with the atheist group Freedom From Religion Foundation. The group sent the clerk a letter emphasizing its strong objection to the decorations, reported KLTV.

"The religious significance of the Latin cross is unambiguous and indisputable," Rebecca Markert, attorney for FFRF, reportedly told Wade, additionally mentioning that federal courts "have held displays of Latin crosses on public property to be an unconstitutional endorsement of religion," said KLTV.

The letter called her displays an "obvious effort to proselytize on behalf of a particular religion," and the group demanded that she take down the crosses immediately.

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And ask and you shall receive: Shortly after receiving the critical letter, Wade voluntarily removed the crosses, according to the station KYTX.

However, while FFRF might be celebrating their victory, the locals in Gregg County are not too happy about this. Many do not even believe Wade was in violation of anything.

"This is a Christian nation, and this nation was founded on Jesus Christ and the Great I Am, the Bible, the King James Bible," remarked Reymond Wright to KYTX.

"All this freedom of religion have all these different sayings about what's their rights, but what about rights as a Christian?" Keyocea Marsh, another resident of the area, said to the station.

However, Markert disagrees. To KYTX the attorney explained, "When a government office or a government employee decides to impose their personal religion on the public, that violates everyone's rights."

"Even if it's a personal workspace, it is in the view of the public and that employee is doing business regularly with the public," Markert said. "The government has a right to restrict that speech."

Source: KLTV, KYTX (2) / Photo Source: Patheos