Texas Using Non-Teacher Creationists to Review Biology Textbooks (Video)

| by Michael Allen

The Texas State Board of Education textbook review panels recently pushed for less science in the state's science books, especially in the areas of evolution and global warming.

Religious creationists, who serve on state textbook review panels, have called for arguments against the theory of evolution. The panels told the Texas State Board of Education to reject the books unless they include more disclaimers about evolution, reported the Dallas Morning News.

Critics have accused the text book review panels of being too religious, but Texas State Board of Education Chair Barbara Cargill recently defended the qualifications of a creationist dietician and businessman to be on a panel to review biology textbooks (video below).

On Sept. 17, Cargill said: “The dietician actually has a degree in food science technology, and they have to take all kinds of science courses, I know, at colleges. And then the person you’re referring to is the retired businessman specializing in finance was the gentleman with the doctorate from Princeton in chemical engineering, so he’s certainly qualified."

Cargill then claimed a lack of teachers applied for positions on the textbook review board.

"And I want to know, where were the teachers when we put out the call all over the state? I know they were busy teaching, but a lot of the reviews were done this summer. So please, please, in the future, get the word out to your contacts because we needed more help, actually,” said Cargill.

According to the Texas Freedom Network, there were over 100 educators who applied, most of whom were highly educated in biology:

We obtained from the Texas Education Agency the list of individuals who applied or were nominated by State Board of Education members to serve as biology textbook reviewers.

Of the 183 individuals on that list, we identified more than 140 who are classroom teachers, school science department chairs, curriculum and education specialists for science, an assistant principal, and assorted other educators. The vast majority of them have degrees and teaching experience specifically in biology.

Sources: Texas Freedom Network and Dallas Morning News