Religion

Rev. Franklin Graham Praises Putin's Crackdown on Gays, Supports Syria's Brutal Government

| by Michael Allen

Billy Graham's son Rev. Franklin Graham recently praised Russian President Vladimir Putin for cracking down on free speech by homosexuals and Russia's support of the brutal Syrian government.

According to Religion News Service, Rev. Graham claimed Putin's anti-gay speech laws are “simply to protect children.”

Rev. Graham also slammed what he called the Obama administration’s “gay-lesbian agenda” that “is contrary to God’s teaching.”

After praising Putin multiple times, Rev. Graham added, "To be clear, I am not endorsing President Putin."

Rev. Graham wrote on BillyGraham.org:

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Isn’t it sad, though, that America’s own morality has fallen so far that on this issue—protecting children from any homosexual agenda or propaganda—Russia’s standard is higher than our own?

In my opinion, Putin is right on these issues. Obviously, he may be wrong about many things, but he has taken a stand to protect his nation’s children from the damaging effects of any gay and lesbian agenda.

Rev. Graham did not say exactly how the U.S. should ban pro-homosexual speech, which he finds distasteful, under the First Amendment.

Rev. Graham also made the laughable claim that all citizens in Syria are protected under the law:

I have never heard Putin quote the Bible, but during his 2012 election campaign, he met with church leaders in Moscow and vowed to protect persecuted Christians around the world. That is one justification for his support of the Assad regime in Syria.

Syria, for all its problems, at least has a constitution that guarantees equal protection of citizens.

In reality, the Syrian government has perpetrated human rights violations (including murder and torture) on its citizens for years, noted the US State Department back in 2008.

The Economist noted in 2010 that the Syrian government controlled dissidents by banning travel.

The BBC reported in 2004 of a Syrian who was jailed for two years for simply using the Internet and emailing.

In 2011, the UN found that Syrian forces were committing "gross violations" of human rights, according to CNN.

Sources: Religion News Service, BillyGraham.org, US State Department, The Economist, BBC, CNN