Religion

Pat Robertson Wants 'Revolution' Because Nurse Asked His Medical History (Video)

| by Michael Allen

Televangelist Pat Robertson called for a "revolution" today on the "700 Club" because a nurse asked him about his medical history.

Robertson, who once advised a viewer to find an exorcist in response to stomach pains, complained today that a nurse asked him about his medical history and health habits during a doctor's visit, noted RightWingWatch.org (video below).

"I'm sitting there and this nurse is saying, 'Tell us about this,'" recalled Robertson. "How many vitamins do you take, how about something else, when did you have and she spent forever logging stuff into the computer because that's what they want to do, that want to have all those records, well, how about me, I'm sick, help me."

However, it's considered good medical practice to ask patients about their medical history, especially older people, notes the National Institute on Aging.

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Robertson's co-host then recalled an earlier "700 Club" report about doctors switching over from paper to electronic medical records, and slammed computer-based records: "We're just overrun by all this paperwork!"

Robertson then claimed a doctor in the report was "working for twelve dollars an hour."

"Socialism," his co-host added.

“Ladies and gentlemen, we need a revolution to stop these so-called progressives from destroying this country anymore, but they are getting pretty close to the tipping point, it is not a pleasant scenario,” said Robertson. “I didn’t vote for him, maybe you didn’t vote for him, but the American people voted him into office twice and this is the result, we reap what we sow.”

However, Robertson failed to mention the numerous benefits of having one's medical records stored electronically, such as quickly sharing medical information between doctors in different locations during an emergency and allowing patients to access their test results online, which the U.K. has been doing for ten years.

Sources: HealthIt.gov, National Institute on Aging, RightWingWatch.org