Religion

Black Pastor Claims Black Families Were 'Stronger' During Slavery (Video)

| by Michael Allen

Dr. Tony Evans, pastor of the Oak Cliff Bible Fellowship in Dallas, Texas, claimed last month that black families were stronger during the days of slavery.

Evans made the comment during an interview (video below) with Dallas Theological Center scholar Dr. Darrell Bock, noted the Christian Post.

Bock and Evans were talking about racial reconciliation when Bock asked what the black community needed to do to "build those bridges."

Evans stated:

When 70 percent plus of your children are being born out of wedlock and the fathers are not there to tend to them, you've got chaos in the community. That's crime, that's unemployment and most of these kids are going to be raised in poverty. I mean, so, and that's something we control, that's something we control.

The white man is not making you do that. He's not forcing you into that position. That's a convenient out. In slavery, when we did not have laws on our side, the community on our side, the government on our side, the broader community on our side, our families were a lot stronger.

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We were a lot more unified and we made a lot more progress. We're going through regression right now and a lot of that is because of decision-making we are responsible for.

Pastor Jimmy King, a 2006 African-American graduate of Dallas Theological Seminary, recently claimed that a faculty member of the prestigious school had told him that they had never placed a black graduate at a white church.

Dallas Theological Seminary responded on its website in part:

The director of placement at the time Jimmy graduated has since passed away, so we cannot verify the details of their conversation, but Kevin Hawkins, DTS’s current alumni and placement coordinator for African-American students, indicated that DTS’s placement statistics show that African-American graduates have been referred to ministries without distinction, including predominately white churches, in the years before and since Jimmy graduated. Dallas Theological Seminary condemns racism in all forms...

(Note: Evans begins these remarks around the 8:00 mark)

Sources: Christian Post, Dallas Theological Seminary
Image Credit: YouTube Screenshot