Religion

Christian Man Stands Behind Facebook Attack On Lawyer (Video)

| by Michael Allen
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A self-identified Christian man, Lou Cobb, is standing by his Facebook attack against Monica Miller, a lawyer with the American Humanist Association (video below).

Miller successfully argued in court that a giant cross that sits in a public park in Pensacola, Florida, must be removed because it is on government property, noted NWFDailyNews.com.

In response, Cobb took to Facebook to post screenshots of Miller's face and her work phone number with a caption: "Here is the idiot attorney that fought for removal of cross in Pensacola. Lets make her famous an run her out of town!"

The angry post about Miller was shared over 40,000 times as of June 26.

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Cobb recently defended his social media attack on Miller during an interview with WEAR. "I never once insinuated hate or harm," he stated.

Cobb, who posted Miller's Washington D.C. work phone number, said he thought she was a local. "I thought she was a local attorney. Don't patronize her. Make it hard for her to stay in Pensacola. If you don't enjoy Pensacola, Interstate 10 runs two ways."

Miller never insinuated that she didn't enjoy Pensacola, but rather argued on behalf of some local residents that the religious symbol should not sit on government property.

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She still found Cobb's Facebook post alarming.

"I don't think that what he said makes it any better if I was a local and he's encouraging others to not give me their business that's just as bad."

Miller said she has received angry phone calls from Christians since she won the case: "Actually the day of the ruling we were getting a lot of phone calls from, I guess you can say angry Christians, using I guess you can say sexist and really inappropriate language towards me."

Cobb decided to leave the post up whether it was right or wrong.

"Right or wrong, stand behind it. If you're wrong, be the first to admit it. In this case here, there's no right or wrong to it. That was a personal belief and I put it out there. I'm man enough to stand behind it."

Miller expressed her hope that people would try to understand the actual issue: "I wouldn't say I was angry I was more just, I wish these people could understand why what we're doing is important and how this cross is different from a cross that's on a church or at someone else's private property."

She went on to add that she has received support from people around the globe, and there have been donations made to the American Humanist Association in Cobb's name.

Sources: Lou Cobb/Facebook, WEAR, NWFDailynews.com / Photo Credit: Esther Vargas/Flickr, Vít Lustinec/Wikipedia Commons, Momo/Flickr

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