Religion

Christian Evangelism Alleged At Army Sex Assault Program

| by Michael Allen
Tajuan McCartyTajuan McCarty

Tajuan McCarty reportedly told about 300 soldiers and civilian employees on April 27 at the Army's Redstone Arsenal in Madison County, Alabama, that "the only way to truly overcome the horrors of rape and sex trafficking is to have Jesus as your King."

McCarty (pictured) was a guest speaker for Sexual Harassment/Awareness Response and Prevention (SHARP) Month.

"They sent out an email stating they were going to have a special guest speaking about her experience as a sex-trafficking victim," an unidentified civilian employee told Military.com. "It didn't say anything about Christian beliefs."

McCarty has recalled her troubled past as a teen runaway, prostitute, and Christian on Pat Robertson's "The 700 Club" TV show.

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McCarty now oversees The WellHouse in Birmingham, Alabama, which states on its website: "The WellHouse provides a safe residential environment to sexually exploited women, offering spiritual, mental, emotional, and physical support services ... The name, The WellHouse, is taken from The Bible’s story of the Samaritan woman at the well, because we are 'a place where women never have to thirst again,' John 4:11-15."

McCarty did not respond to Military.com's questions about her speech at Redstone.

The civilian employee does not hold ill will against McCarty, but filed a complaint with the Military Religious Freedom Foundation (MRFF) because the Army's command is allegedly allowing the promotion of Christianity in the sex abuse program.

"We've tried to reach out through informal means to talk with [the command]," Mikey Weinstein, head of the MRFF, told Military.com. "[Some civilian employees] want an apology and to make sure this situation is corrected."

Weinstein wants the Army to investigate the event and reprimand whoever was responsible for booking McCarty.

"Without [disciplinary action] you don't get any change," Weinstein added.

"While the event was open to everyone and may satisfy one's annual SHARP training requirement, it was not mandatory or required for personnel," the Army's command said in a statement. "The event offered the personal perspective of a human trafficking survivor and those views do not represent the views of Redstone Arsenal."

According to Weinstein, some of the Redstone personnel told him that the event was "all part of the mandatory SHARP presentation."

Weinstein added that the Army's command didn't say why a chaplain opened the event with a prayer that included "in Jesus' name."

The Army holds SHARP events every year to educate troops and civilian employees, and to tell them about the programs that the Army offers.

The Redstone employee told Military.com that the SHARP programs are held several times so that everyone has time to attend.

The employee, a self-described former Christian, told the MRFF in a letter that he respects other people's right to practice their faith, but not at the expense of his non-religious beliefs.

Sources: Military.com, CBN, The WellHouse / Photo credit: tajuanmc/Twitter

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