Christian Activist Group Gets Kim Davis A Seat At Obama's State Of The Union Address

| by Michael Allen
State Of The Union AddressState Of The Union Address

A Christian activist group has arranged for Rowan County, Kentucky, clerk Kim Davis to have a seat during President Obama's State of the Union address on Jan. 12.

The Family Research Council (FRC) told the Washington Examiner that Davis' lawyer, Matt Staver of the Liberty Counsel, will also attend the speech, but the FRC has not disclosed which Republican lawmaker provided the seats.

Davis made news in 2015 when she refused to issue same-sex marriage licenses or allow any of her deputy clerks to do so, based on her personal religious beliefs.

Same-sex marriage became the law of the land after a U.S. Supreme Court ruling. Jim Obergefell, one of the victorious plaintiffs in the historical case, will be seated in First Lady Michelle Obama's box.

In a statement, the White House said there will "one seat empty in the First Lady’s State of the Union Guest Box for the victims of gun violence who no longer have a voice – because they need the rest of us to speak for them. To tell their stories. To honor their memory."

Davis was also invited to FRC president Tony Perkins' "State of the Family" address on Jan. 11.

Perkins will reportedly mention Davis in his speech. 

"While the marriage decision was a devastating principled loss for us all, it was a very personal loss for Kentucky Clerk of Court, Kim Davis," Perkins plans to say, according to an advanced copy of his speech, which was obtained by the Washington Examiner. "Clerk Davis became the face of the opposition when she refused to sanction same-sex marriages by allowing her name to appear on marriage licenses. Kim stood strong to the point of spending time in the local jail until our friends at Liberty Counsel successfully argued for her release."

Davis' deputy clerks have been issuing same-sex marriage licenses since she was released.

Sources: White House, Washington Examiner / Photo Credit: Chuck Kennedy (Executive Office of the President of the United States)/Wikimedia, Carter County Detention Center via Business Insider