Religion

Ball State University President Plans To Review ‘Atheism’ Class After Complaint

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Following a complaint from an intelligent design think tank that a Ball State University class is an endorsement of atheism, the school’s president says a review of the class will be done.

Discovery Institute challenged the appropriateness of the "Dangerous Ideas" course after Ball State President Jo Ann Gora told an atheist organization that had objected to another Ball State class that the teaching of "intelligent design" and creationism isn't appropriate for science courses, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

Gora reportedly notified the Discovery Institute that the university would review its "Dangerous Ideas" class in a letter sent on Monday.

“You can be assured that the syllabi and curricula of all of the courses you singled out, as well as those of other courses offered by the Honors College and elsewhere at the university, are reviewed and updated on a regular basis,” Gora wrote in the letter, according to The Star Press.

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The Discovery Institute is an anti-evolution, pro-creationism intelligent design think tank in Seattle that maintains supernatural forces shaped the universe.

The "Dangerous Ideas" course uses "What is Your Dangerous Idea?" as its textbook. The think tank says the textbook declares that "science must destroy religion" and that "scientists should function as our 'high priests.'"

The San Francisco Chronicle also reports that the complaints are the latest in a series of religion-based flaps at the university since this summer. Ball State was criticized in July for hiring astronomer Guillermo Gonzalez, who wrote a book arguing that the conditions that produced life on Earth suggest an intelligent design. The hiring came after another professor at the school was accused of teaching creationism.

Sources: The Star Press, San Francisco Chronicle