Society

"Real Life Superheroes" Patrol Our City Streets

| by Mark Berman Opposing Views

The next time you need help, you may get it from a real life superhero. A group of people calling themselves, oddly enough, the Real Life Superhero Project takes to the streets of U.S. cities, helping out the needy.

People magazine reports that members want to reduce citizen apathy by exhibiting "superhero" virtues and encourage others to do the same.

The group's Web site writes:

So who are these modern day heroes? They are our neighbors, our friends, our family members. They are artists, musicians, athletes, and yes, politicians. Their actions serve as reminders that as most giving today has become reactive—digital and removed, temporarily soothing our guilt and feelings of helplessness—we have blinded ourselves to simple principles and practice of compassion and goodwill.

According to a report in the Daily Mail, 21-year-old Irene Thomas is one of them. By day she is a self-described "boring accountant" in New Jersey. At night she is "Nyx," patrolling the streets of New York City wearing a black catsuit and mask with a red belt, gloves and boots.

She gives food and clothes to the homeless, and hopes "other people notice and are maybe motivated to help too."

New York production manager Chaim Lazaros's alter-ego is "Life," wearing a black hat, mask and waistcoat.

‘I just feel like I’m walking on air after I’ve helped 30 people,’ he told People.

The ninja-like "Motor Mouth" calls San Francisco home. He generally gets a positive response, but one teenage homeless girl smirked when he handed her a bag of food.

"(I don’t mind) if a million people snickering behind my back as long as there is the possibility to help," he said. He added, "f you live this kind of life, you can’t take yourself entirely seriously."