Religion in Society

Public Forgave Michael, Will They Forgive Catholic Church?

| by Deal Hudson

From InsideCatholic.com

The coverage of Michael Jackson was over-the-top, certainly, but
even more to the point was its breathtaking hypocrisy. (But you have
to love the matching ties and sunglasses at the funeral.)

During
the TV commentary, there was inevitably a shrug of the shoulders
whenever the mountain of allegations about child molestation were
mentioned.

A typical example was on last evening's Fox News
when Juan Williams offered something to the effect, 'There is no need
to bring up old allegations now.' How kind, how sympathetic, how
generous!

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Too bad the mainstream media cannot summon up the same attitude toward Catholic priests.

Since late 2002, when the Boston Globe began
to break the story of Rev. John J. Geoghan's concealed sexual track
record with boys, the Catholic Church has become the object of mocking
derision by the same phalanx of news commentators and entertainers that
now lionize and eulogize Michael Jackson.

Let me make myself
clear: I am not saying Michael Jackson's death should have been the
occasion of smutty jokes and asides. The stars assembled yesterday did
not come to bury Jackson but to praise him, and that's as it should be.
But the stark contrast of the charity shown toward Jackson and the
mocking attitude shown toward our Church by elite members of the media,
entertainment, and political classes is jarring.

Priests
receive sterner treatment about pedophilia and homosexual contact with
underage teenagers because of vocation's moral requirements. Fair
enough. But, as we well know, once a priest has even been accused his
life becomes a misery which has no end. Both inside the Church and
out, that priest is cut no slack and shown little, if any, charity at
all.

I'm glad the media has shortened their memories of Michael Jackson, perhaps they will do the same for the Church one day.