Wendy Casey Battling Son, Randall, to Become Mayor of Illinois Town

| by Alex Groberman
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45-year-old Wendy Casey is currently running against her 27-year-old son, Randall, to become mayor of Dixmoor, Ill.

Being the leading political force in a town of 3,900 doesn’t seem like an opportunity worth going to war with family over, however, the Caseys clearly beg to differ.

"Both of us are in campaign mode right now," Wendy Casey said, according to ABC. "The boxing gloves are on. He's still my son and I love him, but he's my opponent. That's just politics. That's just the way it is."

As if this entire situation wasn’t awkward enough already, Wendy and Randall are currently living in the same home. While their front yard doesn’t display any signs, for obvious reasons, they do have a flyer on their front window telling people to go vote.

Interestingly, this isn’t the first time Wendy and Randall have squared off for a position. At one point, the two battled in a board of trustees election. Both lost. Will history repeat itself this time around? Possibly. But far more interesting than who wins or loses this mayoral race, without question, is the impact that it will have on the family.

"We each put our best arguments forward and neither of us could come to an agreement on who should run," she said. "So here we are today, just two strong-minded people.

"On one hand, I'm proud of him for running for elected office," she added. "But on the other hand, I think he should have waited. It's disrespectful of him. It's like a defiance on his part. Certain lines you just don't cross."

While she tries to put on a brave face, facing off against her son is having at least some emotional impact on Wendy.

"It's hurting me," she acknowledged. "I miss the conversations we had, and we can't have those anymore."

Fear not, though, chances are Wendy and Randall will have plenty of time to reconcile. Neither is favored to win the mayoral position. Incumbent, Keevan Grimmett, is apparently the odds on favorite to hold the seat.

While Wendy was more than willing to speak to reporters about her current interesting predicament, Randall was less forthcoming.

"My 15 minutes of fame won't help the people of Dixmoor," he told ABC over the phone. "I won't be doing any interviews until further notice because I don't want to bring shame on me or my family. A mother against her son running for mayor is a charade that is shocking people. I don't want to add to that. I have too much pride, too much integrity to be used in a way that will bring negative attention to myself, my family and the people of Dixmoor."

For her part, Wendy agrees that running against her son probably doesn’t reflect particularly well on their family.

"It makes both of us look bad, like we're both playing political games. It's bad with our family because they can't show favoritism," she said. "They said someone should step back and he refused to do it, but I raised him to be a strong-minded independent thinker so this is what happens."