Politics

Two More Senators Publicly Support Obama's Iran Deal

| by Ethan Brown

President Barack Obama’s deal with Iran has just been endorsed by two more Senators in the Democratic Party.

Sen. Jon Tester of Montana, who won a close race in 2012, stated his support on Aug. 13. In a statement, Tester referred to the White House’s own talking points in trying to gear up support for the deal.

“After reading the agreement, consulting with experts and listening to Montanans, it’s clear this deal is the only option right now to stop Iran from developing a nuclear weapon,” Tester said in a statement.

Former "Saturday Night Live" cast member turned Minnesota Sen. Al Franken also announced his approval of the deal. Franken’s support is more significant to Obama’s agenda and the Democratic caucus in that he is one of nine Jewish senators in the Senate and one of five to support the deal, the Jewish Telegraphic Agency noted.

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“It’s not a conclusion I came to lightly,” Franken wrote in a post on CNN.com. “It isn’t a perfect agreement. But it is a strong one. This agreement is, in my opinion, the most effective, realistic way to prevent Iran from getting a nuclear weapon anytime in the next 15 years.” You can read Franken’s entire statement here.

With their announcements, 19 Democratic Senators have now sided with the Obama administration on approving the removal of economic sanctions against Iran, guaranteeing the deal with go through. Other Democratic senators., such as Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York, have stated their disapproval of the deal and will vote it down.

Republican leaders in the House of Representatives and Senate will bring to their respective chambers a vote on Sept. 17 that will either approve the removal of economic sanctions or leave them as is. If the GOP receives enough support from both political parties, then President Obama has threatened the use of a veto. At that point, Senate Republicans would need 13 Democrats to vote in their favor to override the veto, USA Today noted.

Sources: Jewish Telegraphic Agency, USA Today, CNN / Photo credit: John Taylor/Flickr