Politics

Trump On State Senator: 'We'll Destroy His Career' (Video)

| by Michael Allen

President Donald Trump said on Feb. 7 he would destroy the career of a Texas state senator (video below).

Trump made the remark at the White House during a meeting with sheriffs from different parts of the country, notes The Dallas Morning News.

Trump asked the sheriffs if there was anything they wanted to say, and Sheriff Harold Eavenson of Rockwall County, Texas, spoke about a state senator:

Mr. President, on asset forfeiture, we've got a state senator in Texas who was talking about introducing legislation to require conviction before we could receive that forfeiture money. And I told him that the cartel would build a monument to him in Mexico if he could get that legislation passed.

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"Who is the state senator?" Trump asked. "Do you want to give his name? We'll destroy his career."

People in the room laughed, but Eavenson did not name the state senator. When The Dallas Morning News later asked him for the name of the lawmaker, he refused to give it.

Eavenson, who will be president of the National Sheriff's Association in June, did tell the newspaper: "[Trump] was just being emphatic that he did not agree with that senator's position. I'm not into assassinating his character."

Republican Texas state Sen. Konni Burton and Democratic state Sen. Juan "Chuy" Hinojosa are reportedly sponsoring legislation that would require people to be convicted of a crime before forfeiting their assets to police.

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The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported in 2014 that law enforcement in Tarrant County seized $7.2 million worth of cash and property from people suspected of crimes in 2013.

Texas law allows the police to seize items they think are connected to a crime. Law enforcement agencies are allowed to keep what they seize, even if a suspect is not charged or convicted, based on a "preponderance of the evidence."

Eavenson voiced his appreciation for Trump's support: "He was making a point about how much he opposed that kind of philosophy. I appreciated what the president said. I can assure you that he is on our side."

Sources: The Dallas Morning News, Fort Worth Star-Telegram / Photo credit: Gage Skidmore/Flickr

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