Trump, Clinton Still Historically Disliked By Voters

| by Ray Brown
Hillary Clinton and Donald TrumpHillary Clinton and Donald Trump

In what might be the least surprising narrative of the 2016 presidential election, both major party nominees are historically disliked by voters.

According to ABC News/Washington Post poll, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's unfavorability rating is 64 percent, and his favorability rating just 34 percent, reported The Huffington Post.

Meanwhile, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's numbers are better, but still not good. Clinton's unfavorability rating is at 53 percent, while her favorability rating sits at 45 percent.

Although Clinton's numbers may not be especially positive, they show a slight improvement since the ABC News/Washington Post poll from August, which showed she had a 56 percent unfavorability rating and a 41 percent favorability rating.

Trump's ratings are about the same as they were in August, when he had a 63 percent unfavorability rating and 35 percent favorability rating.

Trump's and Clinton's numbers have been consistently low throughout 2016. And in March, when they were nearly identical to the latest numbers, they were “viewed negatively at historic levels,” according to CNN. No major party candidates have been viewed as negatively since 1984.

Nonetheless, either Trump or Clinton will become the next president. And even though the GOP nominee's numbers are worse than his Democratic rival's, that might be a good sign for him.

According to the Washington Examiner, the candidate with the higher unfavorability rating has usually won every year since 1984.

Both Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush had higher unfavorability ratings than their Democratic rivals, but each won decisive victories in the general elections of 1984 and 1988, respectively. In addition, Barack Obama was more disliked than John McCain and Mitt Romney in 2008 and 2012.

Only George H.W. Bush in 1992 and Al Gore in 2000 had higher unfavorability ratings than their opponents and lost. 

Sources: The Huffington Post, CNN, Washington Examiner, The Washington Post / Photo credit: Gage Skidmore/Flickr (2)

Do favorability ratings make a difference in who gets into office?
Yes - 0%
Yes - 0%