Politics

Trump’s Son-In-Law Met With Russian Ambassador

| by Michael Allen

The White House confirmed on March 2 that President Donald Trump's son-in-law and senior advisor Jared Kushner was part of a meeting between former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn and Russian ambassador to the U.S. Sergey Kislyak in December 2016 at Trump Tower in New York City.

Hope Hicks, a White House spokeswoman, told The New York Times about the meeting: "They generally discussed the relationship and it made sense to establish a line of communication. Jared has had meetings with many other foreign countries and representatives -- as many as two dozen other foreign countries’ leaders and representatives."

Hicks said that Kushner has not met with Kislyak since December.

That meeting occurred around the same time the Obama administration was preparing to publicly accuse Russia of interfering in the presidential election, and was working on new sanctions against Russia.

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Flynn resigned after 25 days as Trump's national security adviser when news broke of his communications with the Russian ambassador, which Trump officials and Vice President Mike Pence previously denied.

Flynn reportedly resigned because he misinformed Pence about the conversations, which included sanctions placed on Russia by the Obama administration, The New Yorker notes.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions recused himself on March 2 from investigations that have to do with Trump associates and Russia.

On March 1, The Washington Post revealed that Sessions had met twice with Kislyak in 2016, which contradicted Session's under oath statements during his Senate confirmation hearing in January.

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Trump signed an executive order to change the order of succession in the U.S. Department of Justice on Feb. 9, the same day Sessions was sworn in as attorney general, USA Today reports.

Trump's change made Dana Boente, U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia, second in line if Sessions dies, resigns or becomes incapacitated.

Trump blamed Sessions' problems on the Democrats in a statement on March 2, CBS Evening News tweeted:

Jeff Sessions is an honest man. He did not say anything wrong. He could have stated his response more accurately, but it was clearly not intentional. The whole narrative is a way of saving face for Democrats losing an election that everyone thought they were supposed to win.

The Democrats are overplaying their hand. They lost the election and now, they have lost their grip on reality. The real story is all of the illegal leaks of classified and other information. It is a total witch hunt!

Sources: The New York Times, The New Yorker, The Washington PostUSA TODAY, CBS Evening News/Twitter / Photo Credit: Staff Sgt. Marianique Santos/Defense Video Imagery Distribution System

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