Politics

From Hunting Dogs to Drug Overdoses, California Gets 876 New Laws in 2013

| by Michael Allen

The new year will usher 876 new laws into the state of California, reports the Ventura Star.

2013 has the most new laws on the books in the state since 2006.

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Here are some of the highlights of the more important changes:

-- Homeowners won't have to worry about getting a surprise foreclosure notice while their loan modification is being reviewed. Lenders will be required to provide homeowners with a single point of contact during a loan modification.

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-- Registered nurses will be able to dispense contraceptives such as the pill, patch and ring.  Women will not have to see a doctor, but will have to undergo a health assessment.

-- Employers will not be allowed to require workers or job applicants to present their social media accounts or passwords.

-- People going through a bankruptcy will be allowed to keep the tools of their trade and an automobile so that they can find work.

-- Hunters will be banned from using trained dogs to track bears, chase them into trees or bark to help hunters shoot the animals.

-- Owners of apartment complexes will have to have install carbon monoxide detectors in every unit with a fossil-fuel-burning furnace or appliance, fireplace or attached garage.

-- Any person can report a drug-related overdose or seek medical assistance for a drug overdose without being arrested for possession or use of illegal drugs.

-- Drivers will be allowed to use electronic proof-of-insurance documents displayed on mobile phones when asked for that information by a police officer.

-- If same-sex marriages become legal in California, no priest, minister, rabbi or authorized person of any religious denomination would be required to perform a gay marriage.