Politics

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Officiates Gay Wedding, Tips Hand On SCOTUS Gay Marriage Ruling

| by Ethan Brown
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U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who’s been in controversy for her outside activities that critics have said will affect her decision in the federal case on same-sex rights, performed a wedding for two men over on May 17.

According to the New York Times, Justice Ginsburg had a “sly look” and placed a “special emphasis” on the word “Constitution” right before she pronounced the two men a married couple by the powers allowed to her by the Constitution of the United States.

In February 2015, the National Organization for Marriage (NOM) became one of the most vocal groups to publicly request that Justice Ginsburg recuse herself from the hearing and decision of whether federal laws will be expanded to allow for same-sex couples. Since Ginsburg had performed weddings for several other gay couples in the past, then the Justice would not able to be impartial on her ruling, NOM alleged.

Another Justice, Elena Kagan, has also performed at same-sex weddings before and received the same criticism as her colleague. However, it was Ginsburg who said it “would not take a large adjustment” for Americans to understand and support national marriage equality.

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NOM President Brian Brown argued that those comments from Ginsburg should have been enough for the longtime Justice to recuse herself from the case.

“Justice Ginsburg has made it crystal clear that she is going to rule in favor of redefining marriage when these cases come before her. We demand that she comply with federal law and disqualify herself as she is required to do. If she refuses, we will ask Congress to act,” Brown said.

The highly covered Supreme Court decision will be released sometime in June. The Justices heard the case in April – where Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee and Michigan are fighting to continue their voter-approved same-sex marriage bans – but legal experts expect the Justices to rule in favor of same-sex couples, NBC News reported.

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Sources: NBC News, The New York Times

Photo Credit: Wikicommons