Politics

Sen. Angus King Tells Dick Cheney to Get Waterboarded (Video)

| by Allison Geller

U.S. Senator Angus King suggested during a guest appearance on MSNBC that former Vice President Dick Cheney try being waterboarded to see how well he likes it.

“Some people called it torture. It wasn’t torture,” Cheney just said in an interview with college TV station ATV about the interrogation tactic made famous during the Bush administration.

Speaking to students and faculty at American University on March 28, Cheney denied that he was a war criminal responsible for torturing people during his time in office.

“The accusations are not true,” Cheney said.

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The former VP said he's sticking by his views on waterboarding, a method he maintains is not cruel and unusual.

“If I would have to do it all over again, I would,” Cheney said. “The results speak for themselves.”

Sen. Angus King reacted to Cheney’s comments on MSNBC Sunday.

“I was stunned to hear that quote from Vice President Cheney,” King explained. “If he doesn’t think that was torture, I would invite him anywhere in the United States to sit in a waterboard and go through what those people went through, one of them a hundred and plus-odd times.”

King is part of a Senate Intelligence Committee that found that the CIA misled the government and public about aspects of its “interrogation program.”

The Washington Post writes that the investigation found the agency guilty of routinely “concealing details about the severity of its methods, overstating the significance of plots and prisoners, and taking credit for critical pieces of intelligence that detainees had in fact surrendered before they were subjected to harsh techniques.”

“The CIA described [its program] repeatedly both to the Department of Justice and eventually to Congress as getting unique, otherwise unobtainable intelligence that helped disrupt terrorist plots and save thousands of lives,” said one U.S. official briefed on the report. “Was that actually true? The answer is no.”

Sources: The Eagle, Raw Story, Washington Post