Politics

'Will You Please Do Me A Favor': Trump Pleads With Iowa Voters To Support Him

| by Jared Keever
Donald TrumpDonald Trump

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump took to the Iowa campaign trail recently to beg likely caucus goers in the Hawkeye state to support him. 

“Iowa, will you get your numbers up, please?” Trump asked a crowd in Sioux City on Oct. 27, according to The Washington Post. "Will you get these numbers up? I promise you: I will do such a good job.”

Trump’s pleading comes in the wake of four new polls showing the billionaire real estate developer trailing in the state to Ben Carson, The Post reports. 

“I mean, I am second — it's not, like, terrible,” Trump told the crowd. “But I don't like being second. Second is terrible to me.”

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But Trump is left with the difficult task of wooing back voters from Carson without demonizing his opponent. 

Trump made waves with his aggressive approach towards former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush. A similar tactic towards Carson, however, could backfire, considering Carson's soft-spoken nature and his refusal to say anything negative about Trump, NPR notes.

"It's hard to go after a guy who's so nice, all the time,” Jamie Bowers, a 58-year-old Iowan voter, told NPR in an interview. ”Right, right. Don't go after the nice guy.”

But Trump did appear to take a swipe at Carson at an Oct. 24 rally in Jacksonville, Florida, when he mentioned Carson’s religion. 

“I’m Presbyterian,” Trump said, according to MSNBC. “Boy, that’s down the middle of the road folks, in all fairness. I mean, Seventh-day Adventist, I don’t know about. I just don’t know about.”

Some speculated that it may well have been an attempt by Trump to call into question the Seventh-day Adventist religion and paint himself as a more traditional Christian. 

Trump denied that and refused to apologize for the comment after being called on by Carson to do so.

At the Sioux City event, however, he did acknowledge that he had slipped among religious voters, the Washington Post reports.

“First of all, I am a great Christian,” he said. “And I do well with the evangelicals, but the evangelicals let me down a little bit this month. I don't know what I did.”

He promised to continue working hard but said he needed the help of Iowans. 

“Will you please do me a favor and work with my people and go out on February 1st and vote and give us a victory?” he said. “So, I'm sticking with you people. I'm going to spend money here ... I have a great team over here.

"And, I will tell you, I'm going to spend a lot of time here. And I really want to win Iowa.”

Sources: The Washington Post, NPR, MSNBC, ABC News

Photo credit: Gage Skidmore/Flickr (2)