RNC Chairman: Republicans Are 'Cooked' If They Lose In 2016

| by Kathryn Schroeder
Reince PriebusReince Priebus

Republican National Committee (RNC) Chairman Reince Priebus says the Republican party is “cooked” if it does not win the 2016 presidential election.

“…I think that we have become, unfortunately, a midterm party that doesn't lose and a presidential party that's had a really hard time winning," Priebus told the Washington Examiner in an exclusive interview on Oct. 15.

"We're seeing more and more that if you don't hold the White House, it's very difficult to govern in this country — especially in Washington D.C.," he added.

Priebus may have a point, considering that having a Republican-led Congress paired with a Democratic presidential administration has led to many stalemates over the past few years.

After eight years of Democratic control of the White House, Priebus fears it will be hard for the Republican party to come back after a loss.

"So I think that — I do think that we're cooked as a party for quite a while as a party if we don't win in 2016. So I do think that it's going to be hard to dig out of something like that," Priebus said.

”I don't anticipate that," he added. "I think ... history is on our side."

In that respect, Priebus is correct: The recent pattern in the U.S. reveals that after one party is in the White House — usually for two terms — the other party is then elected, according to research provided by Enchanted Learning. There are exceptions, of course, as when Republican George H. W. Bush was elected president following Republican Ronald Reagan. Bush only served one term, however, before being defeated by Democratic candidate Bill Clinton.

According to recent polls, the Republican party should consider backing Donald Trump as their candidate if they want to win. The Fox News poll, released on Oct. 13, found that he would win against Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton by 5 percentage points, according to information compiled by Real Clear Politics.

Clinton was also beaten by Trump in a poll administered by Public Policy Polling. In contrast, when pitted against another prominent Republican candidate, Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, and Clinton, Clinton came out on top.

Numerous other polls also point to Trump being the leading choice for Republicans thus far, according to Real Clear Politics.

Sources: Washington Examiner, Real Clear Politics / Photo Source: Gage Skidmore/Flickr (2)