Politics

Republicans Warn Iran That The Nuclear Deal Won't Last

| by Amanda Andrade-Rhoades
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Although the United States is currently in the process of negotiating a nuclear deal with Iran that would limit the amount of enriched uranium the middle eastern country can produce in exchange for reducing economic sanctions, Republicans have expressed skepticism that the deal will last.

Bloomberg View reported a group of 47 Republican senators signed an open letter organized by Senator Tom Cotton (R-Arkansas), which promises the deal won’t be upheld after Obama leaves office

“It has come to our attention while observing your nuclear negotiations with our government that you may not fully understand our constitutional system … Anything not approved by Congress is a mere executive agreement,” the senators wrote. “The next president could revoke such an executive agreement with the stroke of a pen and future Congresses could modify the terms of the agreement at any time.”

Even Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has noted that the agreement lacks congressional approval. 

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Cotton said Iran should be cautious of any agreement from they accept from the U.S. "Iran's (leaders) need to know before agreeing to any nuclear deal that … any unilateral executive agreement is one they accept at their own peril,” he said.

The United States is not alone in pursuing the nuclear deal with Iran. The BBC reported the UK, France, Russia, China and Germany have joined the U.S. in seeking an agreement, which is set to be concluded soon.

Obama responded that it was "somewhat ironic” that Republicans were trying to create a “back channel” with Iran.

Mohammad Javad Zarif, the equivalent of Iran’s Secretary of Sate, dismissed the letter as propaganda. He said that if the deal was revoked, it would amount to a violation of international law on the U.S.’s part.

Sources: BBC, Bloomberg View Image via www.heymiller.com