Politics

Rep. Vance McAllister Ignores Voters, GOP Asking Him To Resign After Smoochgate Video

| by Sarah Fruchtnicht

Freshman Rep. Vance McAllister, R-La., is ignoring the head of the Louisiana Republican Party who called for him to resign in the wake of smoochgate.

Just four months into his term, a video from McAllister’s office was leaked showing the married father-of-five kissing one of his staffers, who is also married.

The staffer has since resigned, but McAllister maintains his office and plans to seek reelection “unless there is an outcry for me not to serve.”

“If the people are willing to forgive me, I'll keep fighting,” he said this week. “If there’s somebody more perfect than me who they support, it's their will.”

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According to the local Times-Picayune, the Louisiana GOP is asking him to step down.

Roger Villere, head of the Louisiana Republican Party, says McAllister should resign. Villere said he’s been unsuccessful in trying to speak directly with the congressman since Tuesday, according to The Hill.

McAllister’s chief of staff, Adam Terry, confirmed Villere’s resignation request, but said he's not heeding the call.

"He's got a job to do, one he was elected to do and he plans to continue to do that," Terry said Wednesday.

McAllister claimed he would send a letter to House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, Wednesday calling for an FBI probe into how the surveillance video was leaked in the first place.

The Washington Post predicts McAllister’s career won’t overcome the scandal, given analysis of political scandals since 1974. Only 38 percent of officeholders were reelected after scandals involving sexual harassment, affairs or prostitution. The rest chose not to run, resigned or lost.

Since Bill Clinton’s presidency, fewer politicians have been reelected following personal scandal, according to The Post. One of them was Louisiana Sen. David Vitter (R) whose phone number appeared on the “D.C. Madam’s” list in seven years ago. Vitter is still serving.

"Several years ago, I asked for and received forgiveness from God and my wife in confession and marriage counseling," Vitter said in 2007. "Out of respect for my family, I will keep my discussion of the matter there -- with God and them. But I certainly offer my deep and sincere apologies to all I have disappointed and let down in any way."

Sources: Times-Picayune, Washington Post