Rand Paul Calls Donald Trump's Immigrant Comments 'Crazy Talk'

| by Ethan Brown

GOP presidential candidate and Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky appeared on several news programs Sept. 3 to discuss the current Republican frontrunner -- Donald Trump.

In an interview with “CBS This Morning,” Paul cautioned viewers about Trump’s unpredictability and the threat of another Clinton in the White House.

“What I don’t like about Donald Trump is his using the Republican Party and then perhaps going out at the very end after he doesn’t win the nomination and then trying to destroy the Republican Party,” Paul said, according to The Hill. “Ross Perot, you know, ended up giving us the first Clinton and I think that if Trump does this again, he could give us another Clinton.”

Later Thursday afternoon, Trump signed the Republican National Committee’s loyalty pledge, promising his allegiance to the GOP and nullifying the idea of a possible third party run. All Republican presidential candidates are expected to sign the pledge as well.

Paul did another interview later in the day, discussing the “disaster” that a Trump presidency would be.

“I do think Donald Trump would be a disaster for the country and a disaster for our party,” Paul said on CNN’s afternoon program “Wolf.”

“I don’t think you want a nominee (who) offends whole areas of the public, whole ethnic groups,” Rand added, later caling Trump’s comments towards Mexicans and the Mexican government “crazy talk.”

“I think most people who immigrated to this country are assets to our community and came here seeking the American dream, the same way my ancestors did,” Paul said.

During a 2 p.m. press conference, Trump responded.

“I don’t like the fact that there are 11 people now, as I understand it; they’re not getting rid of Rand Paul or somebody, and they should because there’s too many people,” Trump said, referring to the upcoming GOP presidential debate on Sept. 16, which now includes businesswoman Carly Fiorina.

During his morning interview, Paul also discussed the recent controversy in Rowan County, Kentucky, where county clerk Kim Davis was arrested for refusing to grant a same-sex couple a marriage license based on her religious beliefs.

“If society is going to change its opinion on what marriage is, I think it’d probably be better through persuasion than through sort of an aggressive tactic where we federalize everything and force people to do things they don’t want to do,” Paul said. “Ultimately, I think it would be better to probably let people make their own decisions.”

Sources: CBS News, The Hill

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Gage Skidmore