Poll: Strong Majority Of Voters Disapprove Of Obama's Handling Of Iran

| by Ethan Brown

A majority of Americans said President Barack Obama was doing poorly on issues of race relations, the economy, immigration and the Iran deal in a new poll conducted by Gallup.

55 percent of those polled disapproved of the way that the Obama administration is handling the situation in Iran, specifically the ongoing peace agreement. The same percentage also thought the commander-in-chief was doing poorly on issues of terrorism and foreign affairs, possibly due to the ongoing cyberattacks by China and the strengthening of the Islamic State (ISIS).

An even higher number, 61 percent, disapproved of Obama’s handling on immigration issues. The issue of the Mexican border and illegal immigration came back into the spotlight after Republican presidential candidate made controversial comments on the subject in June.

While the President received negative views on education and race relations, it was much closer to those who support him. 50 percent disapprove of the way the Obama administration has handled race relations, while 46 percent agree with his policies. Moreover, 49 percent do not agree with his administration’s policies on education, but 44 percent do.

Obama actually received positive numbers in one category: climate change. 44 percent agreed with his views, while 42 percent felt otherwise.

A breakdown among political ideologies yield expected results. Democrats favor Obama’s handling of Iran by a 56-29 percent margin. Among Republicans, Obama only received 10 percent support compared to 82 percent who disapprove. More importantly, independents overwhelmingly disapprove of the Iran deal by a 58-31 percent margin.

The poll was conducted from Aug. 5-9, placing the dates in the middle of the Iran peace deal debate and the first Republican presidential debate on Fox News. The debate, watched by 24 million viewers, featured topics such as illegal immigration, the Iran deal and other foreign affairs.

Sources: The Daily Caller, Gallup / Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons