Politics

Obama's Approval Rating Holds Steady Heading Into Twilight Of Presidency

| by Ethan Brown

With just 18 months left of his presidency, President Barack Obama continues to receive support from traditional Democratic voting blocks.

According to the poll conducted by the Associated Press and GfK, Obama continues to do well with self-identified liberals, Democrats, and African-Americans, with the latter group going to the voting booths in record numbers during Obama’s first victory in 2008. All three groups heavily contributed to his successful re-election bid four years later.

87 percent of liberals approve of the president’s job performance while 82 percent of Democrats support Obama, as well. While his support among the African-American community has dropped recently, it still remains at a strong 76 percent.

With Hispanics, however, Obama’s approval rating has been characterized as more of a roller coaster. In October 2014, the president’s approval numbers among Hispanics was just 39 percent, as the Hispanic community was urging the president to act on immigration laws. After he signed an executive order granting legal status to millions of illegal immigrants already in the United States, his approval rating rose significantly higher, to its current standing of 65 percent.

Millennials were not specifically split from the “adults under 30” group, making it more difficult to tell whether new voters continue to support the commander-in-chief. Among adults under 30, the president received a 50 percent approval rating. With women of all ages, his numbers is just in the negatives at 49 percent.

The AP also polled voters on their feelings about Democratic presidential frontrunner Hillary Clinton, as she currently leads the race among the Democratic Party for the presidential nomination. Support in all groups was less for Clinton than Obama, which could bring concern to the Clinton campaign.

72 percent of liberals support the former U.S. Secretary of State, while 70 percent of Democrats agree with Clinton’s views. 66 percent of African-Americans also support Clinton, but 53 percent of Hispanics like Clinton – a number that may be troublesome for her campaign as the election nears. Another major concern is Clinton’s approval numbers from women and those under age 30; with women, Clinton only receives 45 percent support, only 38 percent of the younger group supports the former First Lady.

Sources: The Associated Press, U.S. News and World Report / Photo Credit: Olga Lednichenko, Flickr Creative Commons