Politics

Poll: 29 Percent Of Americans Believe Obama Is A Muslim

| by Ethan Brown

A new poll from CNN/ORC finds that 29 percent of Americans believe President Barack Obama is a Muslim, with 1 in 5 saying he was not born in the U.S.

The poll, released Sept. 13, says the majority of Americans believe the commander in chief is an American-born citizen, but a solid minority believe Obama was born outside the U.S.

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When asked their beliefs about the president’s religious views, 29 percent of Americans stated that they thought Obama was a Muslim. That number rose to 43 percent among registered Republicans.

Concerning where the president was born, 80 percent of respondents believed the commander in chief was born in the U.S., while 11 percent of those polled said they suspect Obama was not born in America. Of those polled, 9 percent say there is solid evidence the 44th president is not a legal American citizen.

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For clarification, the president has said repeatedly he is a Christian and has provided documentation proving that he was born in Hawaii, via his birth certificate. In 2011, businessman and presidential hopeful Donald Trump publicly called out Obama for not releasing the certificate to show where he was born.

Overall, the majority of Americans agreed that the president was a Christian or Protestant (39 percent), Catholic (4 percent), Mormon (2 percent), Jewish (1 percent) or just didn’t know (14 percent). CNN noted the educational gap between the two main views, with 63 percent of college graduates labeling the president as a Protestant while 28 percent of those without college degrees said otherwise.

In terms of political affiliation, 61 percent of Democrats said Obama was a Protestant. Only 32 percent of Independents agreed, with that number shrinking to 28 percent of Republicans.

Sources: CNN, The Hill / Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons/Gage Skidmore