Speaker Ryan: War With Radical Islam, Not Islam (Video)

| by Michael Allen
Paul RyanPaul Ryan

House Speaker Paul Ryan said the U.S. was not at war with Islam, but rather radical Islam during a press conference in Washington, D.C., on June 14 (video below).

During his news conference, Ryan also said, "I do not think a Muslim ban is in our country’s interest," notes Talking Points Memo.

Ryan's position contradicts Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's stance, as the billionaire businessman has called for banning Muslims, including Syrian refugees who are fleeing ISIS terrorism in their country. Ryan did not mention his party's presumptive nominee by name.

Ryan stated:

As far as the Muslim community. I think there is a really important distinction that every American needs to keep in mind. This is a war with radical Islam, it's not a war with Islam. Muslims are our partners. The vast, vast majority of Muslims in this country and around the world are moderate, they’re peaceful, they’re tolerant. And so they’re among our best allies, among our best resources in this fight against radical Islamic terrorism. So I think it’s very important we hone that distinction, we honor that distinction.

On June 13, Ryan was shouted down by Democrats who were angry that the speaker refused to put gun control bills from 2015 up for a vote, notes CBS News (video below).

After Ryan called for amount of silence for the Orlando shooting victims, several Democrats yelled, "Where's the bill?"

After the shouting settled down, Democratic Rep. Jim Cleburne of South Carolina tried to speak, but was interrupted by Ryan: "I am really concerned that we have just today had a moment of silence and later this week the 17th ... Yes, Mr. Speaker. I am particularly interested about three pieces of legislation that have been filed in response to Charleston."

Ryan cut off Clyburn again and cited procedural issues.

Sources: Talking Points Memo, CBS News / Photo Credit: Gage Skidmore/Flickr

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