Society

Kanye West: Obama Has Problems In Office Because He Isn't Connected Like Jews, Oil Giants

| by Jonathan Wolfe

Hip-hop artist, aspiring fashion designer, and self-proclaimed messiah Kanye West has been on an interview marathon in recent days. Though his rant routine is familiar to many by now, he still produces one headline quote after another every time he opens his mouth on air.

Earlier this week, West interviewed with former MTV and current Sirus radio DJ Sway. Within no time, the interview devolved into another West monologue in which he proclaimed his genius to the world and compared himself to the greatest creators in human history.

At one point, West spoke about the giants of the fashion world whom West believes are blackballing him out of the industry.

“I am Warhol,” West said. “I am the No. 1 most impactful artist of our generation. I am Shakespeare in the flesh. Walt Disney. Nike. Google. Now, who's going to be the Medici family and stand up and let me create more? Or do you want to marginalize me?”

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When asked by Sway why he depends on a modern day Medici family to back him, West would only say “You ain’t got the answers, man!”

After interviewing with Sway, West headed over to popular New York City radio broadcast The Breakfast Club. In addition to his music and fashion endeavors, West spots as a political analyst from time to time. West invoked President Obama as an example of why networking is so necessary in the business and political world.

"Man, let me tell you something about George Bush and oil money and Obama and no money,"  he said. "People want to say Obama can't make these moves or he's not executing. That's because he ain't got those connections. Black people don't have the same level of connections as Jewish people. Black people don't have the same connections as oil people."

To illustrate his point, West asked host DJ Envy if his position in the radio industry could guarantee his children the same opportunities in radio.

“Can you guarantee that your daughter could get a job at this radio station?” West asks rhetorically. “But if you own this radio station, you could guarantee that.”

For all of the flack West catches for statements like this, he has a point. He knows the entertainment industry has a short memory, and he’s looking to establish other revenue streams to anchor his financial prospects after his music goes out of style. But unfortunately for West, he makes the very people he wishes to network with dislike him more and more every time he opens his mouth. 

Sources: Talking Points Memo, USA Today, Vibe