South Carolina Gov. Haley: GOP Appears 'Cold And Unwelcoming To Minorities'

| by Ethan Brown

Republican Gov. Nikki Haley of South Carolina, who led the charge to remove the Confederate Flag from her state’s government office buildings earlier this summer, gave some advice to members of the Black Lives Matter movement and the Republican Party.

Speaking at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. on Sept. 2, Haley first gave advice to her political party, saying the GOP needs to adapt to a strategy that will welcome more voters in, CNN reported.

“The problem for our party is that our approach often appears cold and unwelcoming to minorities,” Haley, 43, said. “That’s shameful and it has to change.”

She also discussed a potential sit-down with the GOP presidential nominee about joining the nominee as a Vice Presidential pick.

“If there is a time where a presidential nominee wants to sit down and talk, of course I will sit down and talk,” Haley said, according to USA Today.

She also spoke about GOP presidential frontrunner Donald Trump and halted any speculation that she would join Trump’s presidential ticket.

“He (Trump) has tapped into a frustration that’s very real, but Trump does not represent who we are as Republicans,” she said.

When asked by an audience member if she would serve as Trump’s running mate, Haley quipped, “That is so wrong, whoever sent that question up,” The New York Times reported.

Haley also commented on the Black Lives Matter movement that has come under scrutiny this week in the wake of a Houston police officer who was allegedly shot and killed by a Black Lives Matter supporter.

“Black lives do matter,” Haley said. “It’s all about working together. We don’t think we get anything done by yelling. We get everything done by communicating … We will listen to you and work for you and try to bring you together. It’s not just black lives matter, we’ve got lots of groups that want to yell and scream. You can do that, but it’s not going to get you anywhere.”

She criticized the movement itself, saying that black lives “have been disgracefully jeopardized by the movement that has laid waste to Ferguson and Baltimore.”

After nine African-Americans were killed by a white supremacist at a historically African-American church in June, Haley led the plea for the South Carolina legislature to remove the Confederate Flag from state grounds and into a museum.

Sources: The New York Times, USA Today, CNN

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Jorge Intriago, Flickr/Gage Skidmore