Politics

New Poll Shows That More People Are Opposed to Obamacare Than the Affordable Care Act

| by Dominic Kelly

What’s the difference between Obamacare and Affordable Care Act? Well, there’s no difference besides the name, but according to a recent poll, more people are opposed to one than the other.

The poll, conducted by CNBC, found that 46 percent of people were opposed to the new health care law when it was called Obamacare, but only 37 percent of people were opposed to it when it was called by its official name, the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

This, to some, is a clear sign that many Americans don’t know enough about the ACA, but its name is enough to put people against it.

In a similar poll conducted by Fox News, Republicans opposed the health care law more when the language of the question included the term Obamacare as opposed to when it used the Affordable Care Act.

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President Obama said this week that once the health care reform law is officially enacted, people won’t be so quick to call it Obamacare.

“Here is a prediction for you,” said President Obama. “A few years from now, when people are using this to get coverage and everyone’s feeling pretty good about all the choices and competition that they’ve got, there are gonna be a whole bunch of folks who say, ‘Yeah, yeah, I always thought this provision was excellent. I voted for that thing.’ You watch. It will not be called Obamacare.”

With Tuesday being the official start of the new health care law, many are concerned over what it will wind up costing them. The law has a number of provisions, including requiring all citizens to be insured, and providing affordable health care to those who can’t afford private insurance. Those opposed say that it will raise premiums and wind up being a negative thing rather than a positive. Supporters say that it is a big step in the right direction for health care.