Politics

Netanyahu Calls Iran Nuclear Deal 'Historic Mistake'

| by Sean Kelly

In a series of tweets, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu criticized the newly-finalized nuclear deal with Iran — calling it a “historic mistake.”

“I will refer later to the details of the agreement but I’ll say now," Netanyahu tweeted, “when willing to make an agreement at any cost, this is the result. From the initial reports we can already conclude that this agreement is a historic mistake.”

Popular Video

SNL is not a fan of the Trump administration, and it shows with every new skit they produce. Do you think they need to tone it down?

Netanyahu also addressed the terms of the deal, saying that his country would not be tied down by the agreement and would continue to defend itself if need be.

“We knew very well that the desire to sign an agreement was stronger than anything, and therefore we did not commit to preventing an agreement,” he said. “We did commit to preventing Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons, and this commitment still stands.”

Popular Video

SNL is not a fan of the Trump administration, and it shows with every new skit they produce. Do you think they need to tone it down?

Netanyahu also posted a video statement regarding the Iran nuclear deal to his Twitter account.

"The world is a much more dangerous place today than it was yesterday," he said in the video statement.

The deal was finalized early Tuesday, with President Obama announcing it at the White House alongside Vice President Joe Biden. 

“We have stopped the spread of nuclear weapons in this region,” Obama said in his statement Tuesday morning, which was reportedly carried on Iranian television. 

“We are reaching an agreement that is not perfect for anybody but it is what we could accomplish and it is an important achievement for all of us,” he said. “Today could have been the end of hope on this issue but now we are starting a new chapter of hope."

The Iran nuclear deal outlines limitations for Iran's nuclear weapons capabilities. In return for these limitations, some of the crippling international sanctions on Iran will be lifted.

Now that the deal is finalized, U.S. Congress has 60 days to review the deal and vote to either accept or reject it.

Sources: Wall Street Journal, Huffington Post, New York Times, NBC News

Photo Credit: thenation.com, PM Of Israel/Twitter Screenshot