Politics

Judge Right To Keep Clinton Deposition Videos Sealed

| by Nicholas Roberts
Former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonFormer Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

On May 26, Judge Emmet Sullivan ordered that all video depositions connected to Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server while serving as secretary of state be put under seal and not made publicly available.

In doing so, Sullivan granted the request of lawyers for Cheryl Mills, Clinton's ex-chief of staff, who were reportedly worried that video clips of the interview may be used for political purposes, according to The Hill.

Those readers who saw this news and were immediately outraged by it likely did not also see that Sullivan plans to make the transcripts of the depositions open to the public.

"The public has a right to know details related to the creation, purpose and use of the clintonemail.com system," Sullivan ruled.

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Sullivan has not let Clinton off the hook, either.  Depending on what might be learned from early depositions over the next couple of weeks, Sullivan said it "may be necessary" to get a sworn deposition from Clinton, RT reports.

Again: The judge has clarified that no information about these depositions will remain withheld from the public, unless one considers the facial expressions of those being interviewed to be absolutely crucial information.

Not to mention that transcripts are much more easily searchable for fact-checkers and journalists than a video log of such depositions would be anyway. Judicial Watch, an admittedly right-wing organization with an axe to grind, has already posted a transcript of the first deposition on its website.  

In Clinton's case, Judicial Watch has absolutely no motive to doctor or present these transcripts as anything other than they actually are, so people who are worried about any "withholding" of information would do well to look at the transcripts.

The lack of video is entirely inconsequential to how the case will turn out, as all of the information contained on the video will be made public. There is absolutely no reason whatsoever to think Sullivan is "hiding" anything. 

Click here for the opposing view on this topic.

Sources: RT, The Hill, Judicial Watch / Photo credit: Gage Skidmore/Flickr

Should the judge release the video depositions?
Yes - 0%
Yes - 0%