Politics

Joe Biden Opens Up On Loss, Grief And 2016 In Colbert Interview (Video)

| by Sean Kelly
Vice President Joe BidenVice President Joe Biden

In a discussion with "Late Show" host Stephen Colbert on Thursday, Vice President Joe Biden opened up about the loss of his son, Beau, as well as a potential 2016 presidential run (video below).

Biden spoke to his son’s legacy, recounting memories and telling stories of his childhood.

“I was a hell of a success. My son was better than me. He was better than me in every way,” Biden said of Beau, who died in May after battling brain cancer.

The vice president admitted to Colbert that he often feels “self conscious” about the support he receives, due to the fact that “so many people who have losses as severe or maybe worse than mine and don't have the support I have."

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He added that "no one owes you anything."

“You gotta get up," he said. "And I feel like I was letting down Beau, letting down my parents, letting down my family if I didn't just get up. I marvel at the ability of people who absorb hurt and just get back up."

In the interview, Biden was also asked about his chances of running for president in 2016 — a decision he admitted to be wrestling with.

“I want to talk about the elephant in the room, which in this case is a donkey. Do you have anything to tell us about your plans?” Colbert asked. 

“I don't think any man or woman should run for president unless, number one, they know exactly why they would want to be president; and two, they can look at folks out there and say, 'I promise you have my whole heart, my whole soul, my energy and my passion,'" Biden responded. 

“I'd be lying if I said that I knew I was there," he added. "I'm being completely honest. Nobody has a right in my view to seek that office unless they are willing to give it 110 percent of who they are."

Watch the full interview below.

Part 1:

Part 2:

Sources: The Hill, Huffington Post

Photo credit: Tschi/Flickr, Screenshot/YouTube