Clinton's Health Is Not A Legitimate Campaign Issue

| by Mark Jones
Hillary Clinton speaks at the Jefferson-Jackson Dinner in Georgia.Hillary Clinton speaks at the Jefferson-Jackson Dinner in Georgia.

Hillary Clinton's health should not become a topic of focus during campaigns for the 2016 presidential election. 

September has been a difficult month for Clinton, physically speaking.

The democratic nominee almost collapsed at a 9/11 memorial event taking place at Ground Zero in New York City. Clinton could not keep her balance and needed support getting into a van, according to NBC News.

At first, Clinton claimed merely to be suffering from heat according to information also released by NBC. Her campaign released a statement an hour and a half after her episode, saying, “During the ceremony, she felt overheated so departed to go to her daughter's apartment, and is feeling much better.”

Not long after, Clinton's physician, Dr. Lisa R. Bardack told reporters that Clinton was diagnosed with pneumonia at an appointment on Sept. 9.

Clinton recently visited Dr. Bardack to check on a prolonged cough.  On Sept. 5, Clinton broke into a two-minute coughing fit during an event in Cleveland, according to CNN.

The presidential candidate made light of the situation by telling the crowd, “Every time I think about Trump I get allergic.”

Clinton’s visit to Dr. Bardack, however, proved that her symptoms were caused by pneumonia rather than allergies.  

“On Friday, during follow up evaluation of her prolonged cough, she was diagnosed with pneumonia,” said the physician.

“She was put on antibiotics, and advised to rest and modify her schedule,” she continued.

The nominee took her doctor’s advice. NBC reports that Clinton has canceled a trip to California set to take place Sept. 12 and 13.

Beyond this information, Americans need not worry about Clinton’s health.

Clinton is “no spring chicken,” according to Daily Mail writer Piers Morgan. Clinton “has suffered from a variety of ailments reasonably common in a woman of her age,” he wrote Sept. 12.

“But she is running for president, and her health is thus now a matter of massive national importance,” he added.

Morgan, unfortunately, is correct. The American public will latch on to every miniscule detail of presidential candidates’ lives, even if they do not pertain to political matters.

Clinton rightfully tried to hide her sickness at first. Her campaign refused to answer any questions about why she did not announce her sickness immediately after the diagnosis on Sept. 9th, according to CNN.

Clinton and her campaign should not have to answer these questions. 

Morgan reminded readers that Hillary’s husband, former President Bill Clinton, said in 1996, “The public has a right to know the condition of the president’s health.”

This statement, however, does not apply to the former president’s wife, as she is merely a candidate for president.

Clinton is still in the process of running for president. Any and all considerations of her ability to lead the country should be based in factual evidence from her history. Her temporary health scare should not give citizens reason to believe that the former Secretary of State is not strong enough to run the country.

Clinton’s illness is not something on which the American media should focus in the coming months. Rather, the media should focus on showcasing legitimate qualifications for the position that she does or does not possess.

A temporal diagnosis of pneumonia is not a legitimate political concern. 

Click here for the opposing view on this topic.

Sources: Daily Mail, NBC, CNN / Photo credit: Brett Weinstein/Flickr

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