Politics

Gov. Scott Walker Supports Ending Birthright Citizenship (Video)

| by Michael Allen

MSNBC reporter Kacie Hunt asked Republican Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin today if he supported ending birthright citizenship, which he affirmed (video below).

“Do you think that birthright citizenship should be ended?” Hunt asked the GOP presidential candidate.

"Like I said, [Sen.] Harry Reid said it's not right for this country, I think that’s something, we should, yeah, absolutely, going forward,” Walker stated.

Hunt asked Walker a second time if he supported ending birthright citizenship, and he replied:

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This judge looked an inmate square in the eyes and did something that left the entire courtroom in tears:

Yeah, to me its about enforcing the laws in this country. And I want to make it very clear, I think you enforce the laws, and I think its important to send a message that we’re going to enforce the laws no matter how people come here, and we need to uphold the laws.

Kirsten Kukowski, a spokeswoman for Walker, later issued a statement via email that said: "We have to enforce the laws, keep people from coming here illegally, enforce e-verify to stop the jobs magnet and by addressing the root problems we will end the birthright citizenship problem," reports The Washington Post.

Birthright citizenship is based on the Fourteenth Amendment and guarantees U.S. citizenship to every child born on American soil.

Walker was referring a statement Reid made way back in 1993 when he was pushing his Immigration Stabilization Act, which would have not allowed children, whose parents were illegally in the country, to become U.S. citizens if they were born in the U.S., noted the Washington Examiner.

According to his website, Reid co-sponsored the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act (DREAM Act), which would allow children brought to the U.S. illegally years ago by their parents to stay, and have permanent legal status if they stay out of trouble and go to college or join the U.S. military.

Reid also supported the Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2006 and 2007, which would have created a legal pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants residing in the United States.

Sources: Washington Examiner, Reid.senate.gov, MSNBCThe Washington Post / Photo Credit: MSNBC Screenshot