Politics

Magazine Causes Stir With Cover Image Of Trump (Photos)

| by Kathryn Schroeder

German news magazine Der Spiegel is causing a stir with its latest cover featuring President Donald Trump holding a bloody knife in one hand and the head of the Statue of Liberty dripping blood from its neck in the other.

The headline for the magazine cover is "America First."

Edel Rodriguez, a political refugee from Cuba who came to the U.S. in 1980, designed the cover in response to Trump's immigration ban on travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries and refugees, The Washington Post reports.

“I was 9-years-old when I came here, so I remember it well, and I remember the feelings and how little kids feel when they are leaving their country,” Rodriguez said. “I remember all that, and so it bothers me a lot that little children are being kept from coming to this country.”

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In the illustration, Trump's orange face does not have eyes or a nose, just a hollering open mouth. It's also meant to compare the president to ISIS.

“It's a beheading of democracy, a beheading of a sacred symbol,” Rodriguez said, noting that the Statue of Liberty represents the U.S.' history of welcoming immigrants. “And clearly, lately, what's associated with beheadings is ISIS, so there's a comparison [between the Islamic State and Trump]. Both sides are extremists, so I'm just making a comparison between them.”

Social media users were quick to respond to the cover.

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"In case anyone was confused, this is how the world sees the new presidency," filmmaker Morgan Spurlock tweeted on Feb. 3.

"I don't recall [Der Spiegel] depicting Muslim terrorists this way, when they actually do behead people. Just the guy who wants to stop them," a tweet from Ezra Levant reads.

This isn't the first time an illustration of Trump desecrating the Statue of Liberty has been used, nor will it be the last that references his presidency as one that has changed America.

During Trump's presidential campaign in December 2015, he called for a "total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States," and the New York Daily News responded by featuring a cartoon-like drawing of him with a sword in one hand and the head of the Statue of Liberty in the other, according to The Washington Post.

On Twitter on Feb. 3, The New Yorker provided a peek at its new cover illustration called "Liberty's Flameout," featuring the Statue of Liberty's flame being extinguished.

One Twitter user compared the Der Spiegel cover to The New Yorker, writing that the German magazine "wins this round."

"The New Yorker, all somber. Der Spiegel, not f**king around (and nailing it)," Dan Savage tweeted.

Rodriguez has created other Trump illustrations, such as the melting face for Time's Aug. 22, 2016 issue, of which the president was also without facial features.

“That's the way I see him,” Rodriguez told The Washington Post. “I see him as someone that's very angry, and it's pretty much his mouth that's moving all the time, so that's how I tend to show him in some of my work.”

Rodriguez said his Der Spiegel cover is a statement about the kind of country he wants to live in.

“I don't want to live in a dictatorship,” he said. “If I wanted to live in a dictatorship, I'd live in Cuba, where it's much warmer.”

Trump did not respond on Twitter to the magazine covers, but did tweet, "MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!" the morning of Feb. 4.

Sources: Der Spiegel/TwitterThe Washington PostThe New Yorker/TwitterDonald Trump/TwitterEzra Levant/TwitterDan Savage/TwitterRaphael Brion/TwitterMorgan Spurlock/Twitter / Photo credit: U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jette Carr/DOD via Jim Mattis/FlickrDer Spiegel/Twitter, New York Daily News via The Washington Post, The New Yorker/Twitter

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